Columbus Black International Film Festival Call for Entries

Call for Submissions: The 2nd Annual Columbus Black International Film Festival

The 2nd Annual Columbus Black International Film Festival now opens its CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS. If you would like to see an example of the lineup from CBIFF 2017, visit http://ow.ly/haop30fdSYH. Please contact columbusbiff@gmail.com with questions regarding the festival.

ABOUT THE FESTIVAL The primary objective of the Columbus Black International Film Festival is to showcase Black filmmakers locally, nationally and internationally, while highlighting a spectrum of stories told by people of the African diaspora. This festival also provides an advantage for filmmakers and the community to learn about the film industry through educational workshops and panel discussions, a safe space to showcase film, and an opportunity to network with the filmmakers in Columbus, OH. Columbus is the heart of America and home to some of the most creative Black filmmakers in the country. CBIFF strives to showcase new and emerging talent as well as talent that has represented our city for years.

GENERAL RULES & SUBMISSION GUIDELINES All films must be produced, written or directed by a filmmaker of African descent, and must have been completed on or after June 1, 2014.

Short films: running time 5-25 mins, not to exceed 25 mins
Feature films: running time 90 mins, not exceeding 103 mins
Music videos: running time not to exceed 6 mins
Homegrown, a film made by a Columbus native or a filmmaker exclusively residing in Columbus Ohio; running time guidelines will apply
Documentary Film: running time 5-90 mins

Screenplays:
Short: Max 25 pages
Feature: Max 103 pages

Filmmakers will need to send a digital copy of the film in MOV. or MP4 format for screening purposes if selected.
Filmmakers must be cleared for all copyrighted materials including movie posters and trailers.

Filmmakers are encouraged to submit a digital and/or online version of their films in a format such as AVI, FLV, WMV, MP4, MOV, QT, WMV, AVCHD, FLV, H.264, or DivX. If these file formats do not exist, please submit a link to your film on a site such as Vimeo, YouTube, Dailymotion, or MetaCafe. If applicable, include all passwords for video access.

DVD and VHS copies will not be accepted.

Please note: There is a submission fee. With your playable submission, please include a synopsis, crew list, press kit and any stills you would like to appear in the program and/or advertisements if your film is accepted.

Dates & Deadlines

October 1, 2017 Submissions Open

January 31, 2018 Early bird Deadline

March 31, 2018 Regular Deadline

June 19, 2018 Late Deadline

July 31, 2018 Extended Deadline

August 1, 2018 Notification Date

September 27 – 29, 2018 Event Date

Submit all films via Film Freeway at: http://ow.ly/et3f30fdTXu

You can ‘Like’ and follow the festival on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter at @columbusbiff.

You may view the festival promotional video here: https://youtu.be/pPV70KJWDdo

Please contact CBIFF creator Cristyn Steward at columbusbiff@gmail.com, or Keya Crenshaw, PR contact, at blackchickmedia@gmail.com.

Rosa Parks Movie Focused On Her Early Activism In Works From Director Julie Dash & Invisible Pictures

'Queen Sugar' screening, Urban World Film Festival, New York, USA - 23 Sep 2017EXCLUSIVE: Helmer Julie Dash has signed on to direct an upcoming biopic on Rosa Parks, which will center on the decade before her seminal moment on a Montgomery bus, when Parks, already an activist of her time, sought justice for 24-year-old wife and mother Recy Taylor, who was brutally gang-raped by six white men in Alabama in 1944.

The project hails from Invisible Pictures with Audrey Rosenberg (I Am Not Your Negro) and Jess Jacobs producing for the company along with Gary Riotto and Rachel Watanabe-Batton. The film is based on the book At the Dark End of the Street by Danielle McGuire, which Lisa Jones (HBO’sDisappearing Acts) adapted as a screenplay.

Said Rosenberg, “[The producers] were inspired by the book and how Danielle framed black women’s collective actions, reactions, resistance to sexual violence and oppression, but more importantly their agency and how they sparked that civil rights movement.”

Dash was brought on to direct having had experience with telling the story of the civil rights activist. She directed the 2002 CBS TV movie The Rosa Parks Story, which starred Angela Bassett.

“I jumped at the opportunity to dive head first back into the Rosa Parks story,” Dash told Deadline. “Doing the CBS movie, I realized that there was so much more to her life, legacy, and her activism that we didn’t have time in one [movie]. It was fascinating and just as dramatic as the Montgomery bus boycott, which is what she’s known for, but there is so much more.” History

Per Dash, the film will not only center on Park’s efforts, but also the many other female activists who banded together to defend Taylor and demand justice for the crime (the perpetrators were never arrested, and Taylor’s case was dismissed).

“This is a great opportunity to revisit Jo Anne Robinson, Recy Taylor, all the people who never really make it intoThe Rosa Parks Story,” Dash said. “It’s an ensemble cast of feisty activists who changed the course of history” and laid the foundation for future civil rights demonstrations.

Dash underscored the significance of telling authentic stories through an authentic perspective. “It’s important that black women, who know these stories and have intimate knowledge, that we tell these stories in the manner that they were meant to be told… It’s time to see theses stories in a new light and through a female lens.”

Beyond that, said Rosenberg, it’s essential “to understand the importance of people to have this platform and this space to create and tell their stories” to start a conversation. “Out of that incredible and potential collaboration is harmony,” she said.

VARIOUSOne why this story, and others like it, can still be relevant in the current societal climate, Dash offered, “One of the reasons this story is being told is so that people can connect the dots and see that there’s a continuum.” She continued: “Maybe it’s not the back of the bus, but the hypocrisy is the same, the racism is the same, the systemic oppression is the same, and the rape cases are absolutely the same.” Dash said she hope those who see the film will be inspired “with what has been accomplished in the past” and motivated to “understand the bigger picture.”

“There so many things that are happening today that run parallel,” she said.

The film is in its early stages, with a production start date eyed for 2018,  but the filmmakers are optimistic about the project’s reception. “I think it’ll be a wonderful festival movie and we have high hopes for what it can do globally,” said Rosenberg. “We feel that the story is not just a domestic story… we feel encouraged by what we think is going to be the response.”

Dash has left indelible marks of her own in history. With her 1991 film Daughters Of The Dust, she become the first African American woman to have her feature released in theaters in the U.S.; the film is being preserved by the National Film Registry at the Library of Congress and inducted into the Sundance Collection. More recently, she has directed multiple episodes of the OWN/Ava DuVernay series Queen Sugar,which returns with the second half of Season 2 next month.